EDITORIAL STAFF

Sarah Weiser

@sarahwweiser
Image from DDT, Malaria, and the Book That Changed Environmental Debate
Video

DDT, Malaria, and the Book That Changed Environmental Debate

Author Rachel Carson's strike against the pesticide DDT turned her into both an environmental hero and a foil for those who believe regulation has gone too far. That fight is more relevant than ever.
Image from Princess Diana Brought Attention to Land Mines, but Their Danger Lingers
Video

Princess Diana Brought Attention to Land Mines, but Their Danger Lingers

In the late 1990s, Princess Diana brought public attention to land mine victims. But, more than two decades after her death, how much progress has been made in the worldwide fight against leftover munitions?
Image from The Malaria Warriors
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The Malaria Warriors

The West African country of Burkina Faso, an epicenter of the world’s malaria epidemic, is also a thriving research hub where scientists have been embedded within local villages for years, looking for new solutions to combat malaria-carrying mosquitoes.
Image from Life After Welfare
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Life After Welfare

Tianna Gaines-Turner, a former welfare recipient, still struggles to make ends meet with her family in Philadelphia.
Image from Surviving Heroin
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Surviving Heroin

After surviving four heroin overdoses, Heather Wetzel hopes she can stay clean for her daughter.
Image from Faces of Treatment
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Faces of Treatment

A photo essay by Sarah Weiser detailing the difficult path to recovery faced by pregnant addicts at New York City's Non-profit Center for Comprehensive Health Practice, one of the oldest centers in New York City to offer such treatment.
Image from The Story of Sasha and Olympia
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The Story of Sasha and Olympia

Transgender issues today are rooted in a decades-long struggle for inclusion.
Image from A Journey through India: The Legacy of Population Fears
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A Journey through India: The Legacy of Population Fears

By 2030, India is poised to become the most populous nation in the world. The country's fertility rate has declined from an estimated 5.9 children per woman in the 1950s to 2.5 today, but concern over population growth persists.
Image from Lessons from the Nuclear Dream
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Lessons from the Nuclear Dream

A photo essay by Sarah Weiser
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