Teaching About the Civil Rights Era

A recap of an event hosted by Retro Report and PBS Frontline
By Caroline Watkins
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The event included a professional development session, a panel discussion and a complimentary dinner for educators. Photo credit: Alex Remnick

We’d like to thank the more than 30 educators and panelists who attended the event last Tuesday where Retro Report and PBS Frontline showcased classroom resources about the Civil Rights Era at our newsroom in New York. The evening began with a presentation of educational resources related to “American Reckoning,” a documentary about an untold story of the civil rights movement.

Erika Howard from PBS Frontline and Alysha Butler, a teacher and curriculum writer presented “Un(re)solved,” a multiplatform project with an augmented reality art installation that examines a federal effort to grapple with America’s legacy of racist killings.

Teachers were able to interact with the installation by using their phones to scan QR codes that corresponded to multimedia stories.

The event ended with a powerful panel discussion featuring Brad Lichtenstein, one of the filmmakers behind “American Reckoning;” Denise Jackson Ford, the daughter of Wharlest Jackson, whose unsolved murder is at the center of the film; and Kenneth Morris Jr., co-founder and president of Frederick Douglass Family Initiatives.

Our panelists talked about inspiring stories from the civil rights era, and educators shared how they will incorporate these resources into future lessons.

Take a look at some photos from the event:

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Retro Report’s David Olson walked educators through free classroom materials they can use to go along with our “American Reckoning” documentary. Photo credit: Alex Remnick
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PBS Frontline’s Erika Howard spoke to educators about the “Un(re)solved” multimedia project. Photo credit: Alex Remnick
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Our panelists (left to right): Brad Lichtenstein, one of the filmmakers behind “American Reckoning;” Denise Jackson Ford, the daughter of Wharlest Jackson, whose unsolved murder is at the center of the film; and Kenneth Morris Jr., co-founder and president of Frederick Douglass Family Initiatives. Photo credit: Alex Remnick
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Over 30+ educators from the NYC area gathered at the Retro Report office in Midtown Manhattan for the Tuesday night event. Photo credit: Alex Remnick
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Teachers were able to interact with the art installation portion of “Un(resolved)” by using their phones to scan QR codes, which corresponded with various multimedia stories. Photo credit: Alex Remnick

CAROLINE WATKINS is the Audience Engagement Manager at Retro Report.

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